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20121220
20121220
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
austerity pross. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate abt whher e u.k should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall stree
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
. and democratic comgressman eliot engel of new york, who will become that committee's ranking member in the next term. congressman royce, let me start with you. what's the key thing we learned from this report? where do you see the main failure? >> well, i think the main failure when you read the report is in management at senior levels because when you had on the ground was not only an ambassador but other personnel warning that al qaeda camps were growing, explaining that they felt that they were at risk personally, asking for support-- which was not forth come ago and coming to the conclusion that washington was not concerned about their security needs. so all of that comes out in the memos. and i think what has to be addressed is why not only was the preparation not there, but somebody forgot to circle the calendar on 9/11. there was no attempt or no effective way, i guess, desploid should this happen that we could come in with a quick-reaction team and assist them if they come under attack. eight-hour firefight, no assistance through that period. >> eliot engel, do you read it any fferently
to new york and take a look at housing figures in the u.s. it looks like the real estate sector may be moving on up. here in london, will be picture be so optimistic? mortgage and retail figures out later this morning should give us an indication. >>> plus, in a global exclusive, cnbc's geoff cutmore speaks with alex ushmanov on his return on facebook, and his outlook for the xwloeshl economy. >>> welcome back to the program. it's been a busy year. after 12 months of uneven growth, the prospects for 2013 look equally uncertain. billionaire investor and russia's wealthiest man alisher usmanov told cnbc's geoff cutmore that rebalance of growth is need. >> 2013 will be a year where we need to search for solutions. there is a big discussion going on about the state of the global economy. everyone is involved in that debate, in that discussion about wa to do. governments, central banks, economists, businessmen, scholars. so as far as i'm concerned, what really worried me and what i think is the real cause of the uncertainty is the enormous disparity that exists between the various moneta
owners, also new york mayor and christiane amanpour and deepak chopra. they're all here. enough is nuenough. we want to hear from you too. >> good evening, this is our version of a town hall. a big conversation about guns in america. people on both sides of what very well may be the most important issue in this country. take a look at these people. they have all been touched in gun violence in some way. you can pose questions and join the conversation and the debate. have a view. i will ask questions that you put to me and raise them on air. >> i want to start with the place the pain is most acute, newtown, connecticut. where there were more funerals today. few moments ago i spoke to neil heslin, who's 6-year-old son jesse died in the shooting. >> he came late, but he was my best friend and my buddy. i'm just really lost for words. i -- we did everything together. and he had so many favorite spots. where we'd go, the diner in town here, the grocery store, for his bagel or muffin in the morning. mistyville deli where he's go to get his sandwich before school also and his snack. j
this morning "the new york times" and went through the whole thing thoroughly. the result of it is that there is less likelihood of a child with autism to have an aggression against other people than there is for typical children, so not only is there no evidence that supports the fact that they are violent to other people, but they are actually less violent towards other people than typical people and when you really get into these stories about violence and you see children or young adults, what you're going to see generally is people with alcohol or drug problems or some other situation. they're seven to ten times more likely to be violent than typical children and autistic children are less so. sometimes, they are self injurious, but rarely to other people. these kinds of generalizations are killing us. these parents of children with autism, they're frightened, angry. people are talking about you know, autism as though they're acquainted with it. they're using it as a generalization and it's really very sad. this, there's no evidence so far, we haven't seen any evidenc
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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